Tania Koujou, Health Coach and Motivational Speaker, joined our Wellness Wednesday on Instagram Live on June 23rd, 2021, to talk about everyday health meals.

All the questions asked during the Live session are answered below. Let’s have a look!

Q: Why eat healthy food?

A: Eating healthy prevents diseases and helps us live our best life.

Q: How can we eat healthily and enjoy the food?

A: When you stop counting calories and worrying about how each and every bite will affect your body, you will start enjoying your food again. Stressing over food, or anything else stimulates the creation of cortisol. Cortisol is a fat-storing hormone and inflammatory. You only need to take a step back and look at how hurtful it is to think about each detail.

Q: How to eat healthy for the long term?

A: Sustainability. You need to ask yourself if the food you are eating will sustain you for a long period of time. Don’t follow trends, like the keto diet, because some people benefit from it while others gain even more weight. You need to keep a routine and stick with it.

The keyword sustainability here is accompanied by the word “joy”. If you’re happy with a special routine, you can keep it up for a long time. Just like if you hate working out, you will not continue going to the gym, but if you love dancing, you will dance your heart out. This applies to your food too. If you like what you’re eating, you will absorb more nutrients and more vitamins. If you hate the food, your levels of nutrients will be way lower. That’s why you should have joy in your food to create a healthy routine that will become sustainable.

Q: What constitutes a healthy plate?

A: People usually answer this question with “no carbs, more protein” which is not completely correct. Imagine eating only baked chicken or just white rice. That’s not enjoyable. Your plate should be a work of art. You should mix a big part of your plate with proteins. The vegetables can be fresh, sauteed, puree, etc. Also, don’t be afraid to add olive oil to get your nutrient intake.

Q: What are carbs?

A: To start, you need to know that the body gets its energy from absorbing glucose from vegetables. Glucose fuels the body and helps us focus or exercise. Now, what does that have to do with carbs? When you eat carbs, your body breaks them down into tiny pieces and is able to absorb the glucose. Here, insulin intervenes to hold glucose by the hand and store it in the liver or the muscles. When you eat glucose in excess, your muscles, which have limited storage, send the glucose away. The glucose gets stored in the fat particles that can expand indefinitely. That’s why it’s important to stop this excess sugar intake to stop surprising the insulin that is just trying to protect you. In the long-term, you will develop insulin resistance which is a health risk. Eating vegetables, proteins, and good carbs (oats, brown rice, wholewheat grains, etc.) leads to a slow breakdown of nutrients for 4 to 5 hours.

Q: What about comfort food? How to turn it into healthy comfort food?

A: Eating is an experience that involves all your senses. Sometimes we crave chips just because we heard the crunch of a chip breaking. To satisfy that craving, you can add toasted almonds in your salads, for example, to get the crunchiness. Fluffiness also affects our senses just like the smell of a loaf of bread. You crave it warm and straight out of the oven. You can substitute this with a warm cup of tea, soup, or anything warm to get the sensation you’re craving without the unhealthy factor. Also, try to avoid eating your feelings with junk comfort food. This will only lead to a cycle of unhappiness and unhealthiness. Aim for nutritious yet satisfying comfort food.

That’s all, folks! Thank you for joining us for this session, and thank you to Tania Koujou for this valuable information. Stay tuned for more Wellness Wednesdays to come.

If you have any questions or topic suggestions, feel free to reach out to the Mint Basil Market team.

June 25, 2021 — Mint Basil Team

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